--- trunk/www/clonezilla.html 2010/05/13 14:01:58 40 +++ trunk/www/clonezilla.html 2010/06/01 13:23:50 75 @@ -78,8 +78,8 @@

Clonezilla-SysRescCD

Documentation: About Clonezilla Live

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26/03/2010 - v 3.1.0

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Last update: 13/05/2010

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25/05/2010 - v 3.1.0

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Last update: 01/06/2010

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About the Image file [^]

One thing should be made clear about the image file: it is not a file, it is a folder, containing the actual image file and some data about the disk/partition it is associated with. So when you insert the image file name, you actually insert the folder name where the image will be saved/restored.

-Before you are able to insert the image file name, a list of partitions will be presented to you, so that you can choose where it should be saved/found. When you select one of them, it will be mounted under /home/partimag.

- -This folder is very important for Clonezilla Live; the image file must be located under this directory, which means that the image file must be on the root directory of the mounted partition. So you can not, for example, create a folder called all_my_images and move all your image files in there; Clonezilla Live will not be able to find them!!!

+Before you are able to insert the image file name, a list of partitions will be presented to you, so that you can choose where it should be saved/found. When you select one of them, it will be mounted and a list of folders will be presented to you, so you can select the base image directory (first level directory within the partition), which will then be mounted under /home/partimag. This way you can, for example, create a folder called all_my_images in one of your disk partitions, and move all your image files in there; Clonezilla Live will be able to find them!!!

Another thing that should be pointed out is that only unmounted partitions will be included in the above list. This means that if you have stopped the program at some point after specifying the partition where the image file resides, and it has been mounted, it will not be present in the list the next time it is presented to you, and you will not be able to use it.

@@ -218,18 +216,30 @@

-ntfs-ok Skip checking NTFS integrity, even bad sectors (ntfsclone only)

This option works only if you selected the -q option and you're cloning a NTFS partition. It prevents the integrity check of NTFS partitions and speeds the cloning process up a little. However, if the check is disabled, there is a risk that the filesystem is damaged and the image created from it is useless.

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-rescue Continue reading next one when disk blocks read errors

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If this option is set, Clonezilla Live continues cloning even if a read error occurs. If there is one, the disk image will be corrupted, but failing hard drives can only be cloned with this option enabled.

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-fsck-src-part Check and repair source file system before saving

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This option causes Clonezilla Live to check the integrity of the partition(s) to be cloned. If the filesystem of the partition is damaged, Clonezilla Live also attempts to repair it automatically. Enabling this option reduces the risk that the image contains a damaged filesystem. However, the option is disabled by default because the automatic filesystem repair attempt may cause data loss.

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-gm Generate image MD5 checksums

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Causes Clonezilla Live to calculate MD5 checksum(s) of image(s) created. If the image cets corrupted afterwards, the checksum allows to notice the corruption before the image is restored. Mind you, calculating the checksum takes some time and slows the process down a little.

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Causes Clonezilla Live to calculate MD5 checksum(s) of image(s) created. If the image gets corrupted afterwards, the checksum allows to notice the corruption before the image is restored. Mind you, calculating the checksum takes some time and slows the process down a little.

-gs Generate image SHA1 checksums

This option is identical to the above, but creates SHA1 checksum(s) instead of MD5. SHA1 is considered to be more accurate checksum algorithm than MD5, but MD5 is more popular.

Compression method [^]

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-z1        gzip compression (fast with a smaller image)
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-z1p       Use parallel gzip compression (testing), for multicore/CPU
+-z1        gzip compression (fast with a smaller image)
+-z2p       Use parallel bzip2 compression (testing), for multicore/CPU
-z2        bzip2 compression (slowest but smallest image)
-z3        lzo compression (faster with image size approx. to that of gzip)(NOTE!!)
--z4        lzma compression (slowest but also small image, faster decompression than bzip2)
+-z4        lzma_compression_(slowest_but_also_small_image,_faster_decompression_than_bzip2)
+-z5p       Use_parallel_xz_compression_(testing),_for_multicore/CPU
+-z5        xz_compression_(slowest_but_also_small_image,_faster_decompression_than_bzip2)
+-z6p       Use_parallel_lzip_compression_(testing),_for_multicore/CPU
+-z6        lzip_compression_(slowest_but_also_small_image,_faster_decompression_than_bzip2)
-z0        No compression (fastest but largest image size)

This option chooses the method which is used to compress the image while creating it.

@@ -238,11 +248,19 @@

Gzip and lzop are fast compression methods. Lzop is many times faster than gzip, but creates slightly larger images. Clonezilla Live warns that lzop requires good-quality RAM, but I (the contributor who wrote this chapter) think other compression methods require good RAM too.

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Bzip2 and lzma are powerful compression methods. Lzma creates a little smaller images than bzip2, and decompressing lzma-compressed images is faster than decompressing bzip2 images. But there is no free lunch: lzma compression method is very slow compared even to bzip2, which isn't fast method either.

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Bzip2, lzma, xz and lzip are powerful compression methods. Lzma creates a little smaller images than bzip2, and decompressing lzma-compressed images is faster than decompressing bzip2 images. But there is no free lunch: lzma compression method is very slow compared even to bzip2, which isn't fast method either.

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Lzma method is becoming obsolete, and both xz and lzip are attempting to become its successor. They are a bit less powerful compression methods than lzma, but much faster. The differences between xz and lzip are virtually non-existent.

+ +

If you don't use the i486 version of Clonezilla-SysRescCD and your processor contains multiple cores and/or supports Hyper-Threading, parallel gzip, bzip2, xz and lzip compression methods are also available. Parallel compression means that each processor core compresses a different part of the image at a time. Without parallel compression one core compresses everything.

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The speed impact caused by parallel compression depends on the number of processor cores available. In addition, Hyper-Threading increases the speed by about 30 % if parallel compression is used. For example, if your processor contains four cores and supports Hyper-Threading, speed with parallel compression is nearly 5,2 times as high as without. However, parallel compression is currently an experimental feature.

Splitting [^]

This option (command line: -i [number]) decides if the created image files are splitted into smaller pieces, and if yes, how large the pieces are. This setting doesn't usually matter, but some filesystems (most importantly FAT32) don't allow files larger than four gigabytes. If you're saving the disk image to a FAT32 partition, enter 4000 or less. (Value 0 disables splitting, so don't use it in that case.) If the filesystem allows files big enough, enter any value which isn't too small (you don't want to split the image into too many pieces, do you?)

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Clonezilla Live warns that it is no longer safe to disable splitting because value 0 can confuse init. I (the contributor) don't know what the warning exactly means and haven't been able to reproduce the problem. Anyway, entering a very big value, for example 999999999999, is a safe way to keep the image in one piece.

Postaction [^]

@@ -300,6 +318,9 @@

-e sfdisk uses the CHS value of hard drive from the saved image

Force to use the saved CHS (cylinders, heads, sectors) when using sfdisk. Of cource, there is no use of it when using any of -j0, -k or -k2 options.

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-icrc Ignore CRC checking of partclone

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This option causes partclone to skip checking the CRC32 checksums of the image. Enabling this option speeds the restore process up. However, if this option is enabled and the -cm and -cs options are disabled, there is no way to notice if the image has corrupted.

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-j1 Write MBR (512 B) again after image is restored. Not OK for partition table diffe

When a disk image is restored, the partition table must be updated to reflect the actual partitions in the disk. If you don't want it to happen, enable this option. Then the Master Boot Record (including the partition table) is restored again after restoring the image. Note that using this option can destroy all the data in the target drive.

@@ -344,7 +365,7 @@ We read in DRBL FAQ/Q&A:

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When I use clonezilla to clone M$ windows, there is no any problem when saving an image from template machine. However, after the image is restored to another machine, it fails to boot, the error message is "Missing Operating System". What's going on ?

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When I use clonezilla to clone M$ windows, there is no any problem when saving an image from template machine. However, after the image is restored to another machine, it fails to boot, the error message is "Missing Operating System". What's going on ?

Usually this is because GNU/Linux and M$ windows interpret the CHS (cylinder, head, sector) value of harddrive differently. Some possible solutions:
  1. Maybe you can change the IDE harddrive setting in BIOS, try to use LBA instead of auto mode.
@@ -388,13 +409,13 @@

where X: is the drive letter of the disk. When done, boot back into Clonezilla Live and repeat the backup procedure.

-If the Windows version you use is not XP, boot into SystemRescueCD (graphical mode is not needed) and run the following command: +

If the disk/partition you are trying to backup is not the Windows System disk (usually C:), you can boot Windows, and execute the command in a DOS window. To open a DOS window click Start / Run... and at the prompt Open: type cmd.

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If the Windows version you use is not XP and you're trying to backup the Windows System drive, boot into SystemRescueCD (graphical mode is not needed) and run the following command:

ntfsfix /dev/hda1

where /dev/hda1 is the partition name in GNU/Linux. When done, boot back into Clonezilla Live and repeat the backup procedure.

-If the disk/partition you are trying to backup is not the Windows System disk (usually C:), you can boot Windows, and execute the command in a DOS window. To open a DOS window click Start / Run... and at the prompt Open: type cmd. -
  • If Windows XP Recovery Console is not available, you don't have the time to execute the procedure described above, or even if you have executed it but you still get the same message, and you are absolutely sure that you get this message because the NTFS partition is really scheduled for check, and it's not because Windows crushed or have become corrupt, you can mount the patririon by hand and tell Clonezilla Live to use it. Assuming the partition is /dev/hda1, exit the program and execute the commands:

    sudo su -
    ntfs-3g -o force /dev/hda1 /home/partimag